Morning Meditations: Swami SatyaDaya 30 October

A meditation using the paradigm of the chakras to explore holding patterns within the ‘energetic space’ of the interior.

We often use the sense of interior Space, with reference to the areas related to specific chakras; the obvious example being the Heart Space, Hridayakasha, and the Anahata chakra. Holding of tension can be mental/emotional or even related to physical tension.

I am Conscious

A guided meditation with the potential to radically transform understanding. Swami Nishchalananda gave this meditation as part of the Advaita online course given over two days in October 2020, hosted by Mandala Yoga Ashram.

Appreciation…..
Appreciate how the merest thought allows this body to act, to do things, make movements.
Appreciate others around us.
Appreciate Life, especially the fact that we have been given tools to allow us to explore it more deeply.

Navaratri

Swami Nishchalananda gave this online satsang and guided meditation on Friday evening, October 16th, just before the start of Navaratri. The following is his explanation of this celebration, and recommendations for mantras and chants during the period.

NavaRatri starts next Saturday 17 th October and ends on Monday 25 th October (depending on the
tradition and parts of India there are different dates, mantras and rituals; some celebrations are very elaborate over the nine days; below we have given a streamlined version). Navaratri literally means ‘Nine Nights’. It is celebrated every year all over India and elsewhere in the world among Hindus as well as many yoga practitioners. It is a celebration of the Goddess, the cosmic energy (known as Durga, Kali, Lakshmi, Saraswati and countless other names). This energy creates, sustains and destroys the universe, including everyone and everything in it.


Navaratri is based on the lunar calendar and comes just after amarvasya (new moon) in the month of Ashwin. (It is also known as Durga Puja, especially in Bengal and Bihar etc., celebrating Durga’s victory over Mahishasura, the buffalo demon, who symbolises blind ignorance, especially spiritual ignorance).

I would like us to join together in participating in this celebration.

Swami Nishchalananda


I would like us to join together in participating
in this celebration. I propose the following mantras
 (which I have greatly simplified, but which,
nevertheless, will be enormously effective),
together with the corresponding dates:

The mantras are as follows:

Durga Sat/Sun/Mon 17, 18 & 19 Oct
Lakshmi Tues/Wed/Thurs 20, 21 & 22 Oct
Saraswati Fri/Sat/Sun 23, 24 & 25 Oct

Om Dum Durgayai Namaha
Om Shrim Lakshmyai Namaha
Om Aim Saraswatyai Namaha


The last day, the tenth day, is known as Dashmi, Dussehra (Hindi) or Vijayadashmi. (It also celebrates Rama’s victory over Ravana). On this tenth day, you are invited to chant Om Namah Shivaya.
OR, if you wish, you can chant the 32 names of Durga throughout the nine days (see at the end of this message).

Note: Divali or Deepavali comes this year on the 14 Nov (based on lunar calendar it comes on the 15 th day of the lunar month of Kartik on the amarvasya, or new moon). This is the Festival of Lights which symbolises Enlightenment.


The 32 Names of Durga:
OM Durga Durgartishamani Durgapadvinivarini
Durgamacchedini Durgasadhini Durganashini
Durgatoddharini Durganihantri Durgamapaha
DurgamaGyanada Durgadaityalokadavanala
Durgama Durgamaloka Durgamatmaswarupini
Durgamargaprada Durgamavidya Durgamashreeta
Durgamagyanasamsthana Durgamadhyanabhasini
Durgamoha Durgamaga Durgamarthaswarupini
Durgama surasamhantri Durgamayudhadharini
Durgamangi Duramata Durgamya Durameshwari
Durgabhima Durgabhama Durgabha Durgadarini
(In my opinion, the sound vibration is more important than the meaning, but you will find the meaning on page 82 of the Ashram publication ‘Mantra Yoga and Ashram Chants’)

Swami Nishchalananda on the Yugas, and other matters

An online satsang given on the evening of Friday 9th October, 2020

After a poignant rendition of Maha Mrityun Jaya Mantra, chanted for those who need healing, Swamiji responded to a question from someone who had been reading the Markardeya Purana. The Puranas are ancient text that use a story form, often to convey some wisdom from that time. This text contains a discussion on the theory of the ‘Yugas’ or epochs of time lasting many thousands of years. In the satsang Swamiji explains how this model depicts a progression though ages where the Knowledge of the Self is foremost, through to the age of ‘Kali Yuga’ where people live as if such knowledge is completely absent and utter selfishness rules.

Maha Sattwa – a Guided Meditation on the Koshas

…. from the recent course that she and Swami Nishchalananda gave on ‘Pancha Kosha’. The five koshas, (layers or sheaths), are a model of understanding, a paradigm, of human beings. In this guided meditation Maha Sattwa encourages an exploration of the first three koshas*.

Coping with this viral situation… and other matters

Swami Nishchalananda gave this satsang via Zoom on Friday evening, 25th September

The themes in this session were driven by people’s questions. The first one was asking for tips on surviving the see-saw regulations being imposed on us during the coronavirus ‘Pandemic’.

Discourse on Ishavasya Upanishad

A commentary on the Ishavasya Upanishad by Swami Nishchalananda on Friday 28th of August. This was Swamiji’s usual Friday evening online get-together with people from Europe and the UK, organised by Mandala Yoga Ashram.

This Upanishad starts with the Shanti Path (Invocation of Peace), Om Purnamadaha – for a translation and to hear this wonderful chant, here’s a link to a post on this blog from earlier in the year.

The Unreal has no existence, the Real will always be.

A commentary on Verse 16 of Chapter 2 from the Bhagavad Gita by Swami Nishchalananda, extracted from a longer online transmission given to a group of people from Europe and the UK.

Swami Nishchalananda studied with his teacher, Swami Satyananda Saraswati, in India for 14 years and during that time explored the rich history of Yoga and Tantra in the land of their origin. The Bhagavad Gita is an astonishing text. It doesn’t matter whether it narrates a historical event or whether it is allegorical myth; the Wisdom expressed is profound. The translation Swamiji is using is that of Swami Sivananda Saraswati, the Teacher and Guru of Swami Satyananda.